Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Will the Supreme Court become Probabilistic?

If this case gets acccepted by the US Supreme Court, it is going to be awful, just awful. A Guaitanamo detainee is appealing his case on the basis that the previous rule was wrongfully made using arguments of conditional probabilities. Keep in mind that this is the very same Supreme Court (well, Kagen is new, but the other 8 are the same) that previously stated 2 + 2 = 5, so how are they going to understand probabilities, their proper use and potential for abuse?

2 comments:

johns said...

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Cara said...

The concept of a Probabilistic Supreme Court, where decisions are influenced by statistical probabilities rather than absolute legal interpretation, is speculative and largely theoretical. While some scholars may entertain the idea as a potential evolution in judicial decision-making, it remains highly contentious and unlikely in the foreseeable future due to the foundational principles of legal interpretation and the nature of the judicial system. Any transition towards probabilistic decision-making would require significant shifts in legal philosophy, structure, and societal acceptance, making it a complex and distant possibility.
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